10 Influential Quotes from 10 Powerful Women of the 20th Century

This is our time to rise and actualize! As women lead the way through an authentic expression of who we are, by leveraging feminine virtues instead of burying them, we will create a more integrated world where the best of the masculine and the feminine work in harmony. At Emerging Women Live you’ll hear from some of the most fantastic women visioneers of our time. These are women who are not afraid to be themselves as they take creative risks or launch BIG ideas into the world.
This post celebrates some of the most brilliant, courageous, authentic women trailblazers of the 20th century. These women’s wisdom inspire and motive us to move forward and continue to challenge the conventional.

1. “The most courageous act is still to think for yourself. Aloud.”― Coco Chanel

Coco Chanel (1883 – 1971) was the only fashion designer to appear on Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century. She completely revolutionized the fashion industry by freeing women of corsets and introducing a more comfortable, casual chic look. Her signature scent, Chanel No. 5, has become an iconic product.

 
Image: Amelia Earhart

2. “The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure , the process is its own reward.”― Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart (1897–1937) was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. Her courage and willpower opened the skies to other women. She was also a best-selling author, and she was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. She was also a member of the National Woman’s Party, and an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment. In 1937 while attempting to become the first person to fly around the world, Earhart’s plane disappeared over the Pacific Ocean.

Photo of Ella FITZGERALD

3. “Just don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do. Where there is love and inspiration, I don’t think you can go wrong.” ― Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald (1918–1996) is considered one of the greatest jazz singers of all time. Over the course of her 59-year recording career, she sold 40 million copies of her 70-plus albums, winning countless awards and commendations, including honorary doctorates at Yale and Dartmouth, the National Medal of Arts, and 13 Grammy Awards, including one in 1967 for Lifetime Achievement. In 1979 she was given a Kennedy Center Award for her lifetime in the performing arts.

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4. “I tore myself away from the safe comfort of certainties through my love for truth – and truth rewarded me.” ― Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir (1908 – 1986) was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist, and social theorist. In 1949, Simone de Beauvoir published The Second Sex, which quickly became a feminist classic, inspiring women of the 1950s and 1960s to examine their role in culture. In the chapter “Woman: Myth and Reality” of The Second Sex, Beauvoir argued that men had made women the “Other” in society by putting a false aura of “mystery” around them. She argued that men used this as an excuse not to understand women or their problems and not to help them, and that this stereotyping was always done in societies by the group higher in the hierarchy to the group lower in the hierarchy.

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5. “Each person must live their life as a model for others.” ― Rosa Parks

 

Rosa Parks (1913 – 2005) was an African-American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement”.  On December 1, 1955, an unknown seamstress in Montgomery, Alabama refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger. This brave woman, Rosa Parks, was arrested and fined for violating a city ordinance, but  her act of defiance marked the beginning of the modern civil rights movement in the United States and ultimately lead to the end of legal segregation in America. Her courage made her an inspiration to freedom-loving people everywhere.

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6. “I feel there is something unexplored about women that only a woman can explore.” ― Georgia O’Keeffe

 

Georgia O’Keeffe (1887 –1986) was a prominent  woman painter. Georgia O’Keeffe prevailed in a what was a long time a man’s world, and became a key figure in the American Modern Art. In 1962, O’Keeffe was elected to the fifty-member American Academy of Arts and Letters. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1966. In 1970, when she was 83 years old, a retrospective exhibition of her work was held at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The New York critics and collectors recognized her as an artist ahead of her time. Her work hangs today in museums and private collections around the world.

7.  “Odd how the creative power at once brings the whole universe to order.” ―Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941) was an English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Woolf is a key figure in the modernist literary movement. She is best known for her writings between World War I and World War II including the 1929 essay, “A Room of One’s Own,” and novels Mrs. Dalloway and Orlando. In her work she examined the difficulties that female writers and intellectuals face because men hold disproportionate legal and economic power and the future of women in education and society.

8. “We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face… we must do that which we think we cannot.” ― Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962) was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, holding the post from 1933 to 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office. She was the first presidential spouse to hold press conferences, write a syndicated newspaper column, and speak at a national convention. As a champion of human rights, she strove to further women’s causes as well as the causes of black people, poor people, and the unemployed. She served as the first chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights, and oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Later she chaired the John F. Kennedy administration’s Presidential Commission on the Status of Women.

9. “True happiness… is not attained through self-gratification, but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.”  ― Helen Keller

 

Helen Keller (1880–1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. A childhood disease left Helen deaf, mute, and blind. Her story became popular through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Keller campaigned for women’s suffrage and labor rights. She was inducted into the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame in 1971. Keller wrote a total of 12 published books and several articles.

10.  “Woman must not accept; she must challenge. She must not be awed by that which has been built up around her; she must reverence that woman in her which struggles for expression.” ― Margaret Sanger

 

Margaret Sanger (1879–1966) was an American birth control activist, sex educator, and nurse. Sanger popularized the term birth control, opened the first birth control clinic in the United States, and established organizations that evolved into the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Sanger’s efforts contributed to several judicial cases that helped legalize contraception in the United States. Sanger is regarded as a leading figure in the battle for American women’s rights.

Want more? Check out these 10 Badass Quotes from 10 Badass Women:

 

And then join ALL the badasses at our annual Emerging Women Live! Registration is now open HERE.

Juicy Bites: Feminine Values are Shaping Modern Leaders

This week we learn:

  • The importance of feminine values in shaping modern leaders
  • The “100 Natural Laws of Cliteracy”
  • Why it’s important to practice courage, vulnerability and authenticity
  • Why admitting your struggles may save your startup
  • Overcoming the real issues immigrant women face when pursuing their dreams
  • Caroline Ghos’s take on  Marissa Mayer’s recent controversial feature in Vogue

At the end of this post, we encourage you to join us for a conversation. Please leave your comment below.

What is it that makes you feel deeply vulnerable?

1. “Feminine” Values Can Give Tomorrow’s Leaders an Edge via Harvard Business Review

Today’s work requires a new leadership paradigm. This article, a study based on 64.000 people around the world, reveals that both men and women leaders should incorporate more feminine values.

“If people have grown cold on male-dominated structures and leadership, they offer a solution: Two-thirds of survey respondents felt that “The world would be a better place if men thought more like women”, including 76% of the French and Brazilians and 70%of Germans.”

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2. Cliteracy 101: Artist Sophia Wallace Wants You To Know The Truth About The Clitoris via Huff Post Women

New York artist Sophia Wallace wants everyone to be cliterate. Wallace’s project entitled “Cliteracy” includes “100 Laws of Cliteracy,” street art about the organ, as well as a “clit rodeo” that involves an interactive installment of a giant golden clitoris.  Her artwork has a much broader focus than sexual pleasure.

“It is a curious dilemma to observe the paradox that on the one hand the female body is the primary metaphor for sexuality, its use saturates advertising, art and the mainstream erotic imaginary. Yet, the clitoris, the true female sexual organ, is virtually invisible,” Wallace told Creem magazine earlier this year.

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3. Brené Brown On Why Courage, Vulnerability And Authenticity Have To Be Practiced via Huff Post

Brené Brown champions the feminine virtues of authenticity and vulnerability. Her work gives people permission to be themselves, and that’s probably the greatest gift anybody could give.

In the interview, published in Origin Magazine, and picked by Huff Post, we talked about taking risks. Brené exposed the painful ways we “say ‘yes’ when we mean ‘no’, and say ‘no’ when we mean ‘hell yes.’” She  invites us to get in the arena and “get (our) ass kicked on occasion” — all in the name of living our truth.

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4. Can honesty save a startup? via Forbes Women

This article tells the moving story of two women entrepreneurs who decided to be honest and acknowledge the difficulties, challenges and frustrations of starting your own business. Jessica Lybeck and Erin Hopmann, founders of Dabble, created a blog called “30 Days of Honesty” where they allowed themselves to be vulnerable, authentic and admit their day to day struggles. Stella Fayman, a serial entrepreneur, believes that their decision is a bold and inspiring move: “I applaud them for their integrity and authenticity in sharing such a harrowing time with the public. If only we could all be a little bit more honest, we could help each other and solve our own problems much more quickly.”

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5. The Women Who Do it All but Don’t Have it All via Washington Post

In this article, Georgeta Dragoiu, managing director and co-founder of MDC Strategies, talks about the cruel realities immigrant women have to face when trying to pursue their dreams. She explains:

“While money isn’t always the solution, it is certainly a key part of the problem. For many women, believing they can lean in to a career, rather than multiple low-paying jobs, starts when they’re exposed to alternate realities. They need a sense of community that extends beyond others who sound or look like them, and that can help them see new opportunities. That’s why we should make sure the debate on women’s empowerment doesn’t leave out those who can’t afford the same set of choices.”

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6. Dear Marissa Mayer Critics: It’s Time To Rally Around Great Leaders Everywhere via Fast Company

Caroline Ghosn discusses the recent controversial appearance of Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!, in a feature in September’s issue of Vogue. Caroline explains:

“At the end of the day, perpetrating this culture of intense scrutiny–especially as it is applied to unconventional-looking leaders–makes us all the poorer. All we are doing is continuing to validate the noxious benchmark that leaders need to look and act a certain way.‬”

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This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:

What is it that makes you feel deeply vulnerable?

Juicy Bites This Week: The Road to Accepting Your Feminine Power

This week we find out:

  • Tara Sophia Mohr’s interpretation of “purpose of life”
  • What are the 4 women’s issues that haven’t changed since 1911
  • How to unlearn in order to accept your feminine power
  • Why in order to succeed women need more ambition

At the end of this post, we encourage you to join us for a conversation. This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women, is:

1. Debunking the Whole “Life Purpose” Thing via Tara Sophia Mohr Wise Living

Tara Sophia Mohr believes that the traditional “life purpose” that each of us is searching for with angst, can actually be something that we don’t even acknowledge in our lives. In this blog post Tara also offers a short practice of how you can connect with your true purpose every morning.

“Here’s the truth: Your purpose is to bring more love to this earth. It is to heal where there is brokenness. It is to bring light where there is darkness. It is to restore sanity where insanity reigns, kindness where fear has taken over.”

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2. Four Women’s Issues That Haven’t Changed Since 1911 via Huff Post Women

Over 100 years ago, radical writer and activist Emma Goldman penned the essay “The Tragedy of Woman’s Emancipation.” Goldman explored issues of equal pay, the tension between family life and home life, and the obstacles that inhibit true gender equality. Many of  the issues Goldman fought for feel nearly as relevant now as they must have then. Here are 4 of them:

1. Men dominate many of the most esteemed professional fields — and get paid more for their work.

2. Work stress disproportionately impacts women.

3. The “freedom” the workplace supposedly offers women sometimes doesn’t feel so free at all.

4. Women are doubling up on work at home and outside of the home.

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3. Unlearning to find your way via Role Models Wanted

I had the great pleasure to be interviewed by Jenn Aubert, an entrepreneur, acupuncturist, business mindset coach, and writer. Her mission is to help women entrepreneurs get out of their own way so that they can live big. She helps female entrepreneurs bust through limiting beliefs, fears and self-doubts so that they can build and grow successful businesses.

In this interview we talk about the road to accepting your feminine power, and learning how to incorporate more feminine leadership qualities into your professional life; how to achieve true connection, collaboration and how to allow yourself to be vulnerable.

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 4. Women Need More Than Confidence to Succeed, They Need Ambition via Huff Post Women

More than 70 percent of high school valedictorians in 2012  were women and it’s a well known fact that for decades, more female students than male students have graduated from college. Later on numbers drop dramatically for women: to 37 percent for mid-managers, and even lower, to 26 percent, for vice presidents and up. Women head slightly more than 4 percent of Fortune 500 companies. Continue Reading…

Dr. Peggy Drexler explains:

“Could bias, in fact, happen not only from the top down but also the inside out?It can. Persistent bias felt or perceived at any point in a woman’s career can erode her own ambition by causing her to feel less confident about her skills and abilities. She then strives for less. She doesn’t get the promotion or the raise not because it’s given to a man, or because she somehow doesn’t measure up, but because she’s voluntarily taken herself out of the running. It’s not confidence or ability that women are lacking, but ambition they’ve lost–or let go of–along the way.”

 

This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:

“How would describe, in one word, feminine power?”

Let’s start a conversation. We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below.

Juicy Bites This Week: Women Define Happiness

Juicy Bites:  small nibbles of quality content.

This week we find out:
 

  • What do women have to do with Bill Gates’s generosity?
  • How can we adopt entrepreneurial thinking?
  • What’s Tina Fey’s definition of ‘Perfect Happiness’?
  • What role did Lindy Boggs play in Women’s History?
  • What’s Karen Finerman’s career advice?

 
At the end we encourage you to join us for a conversation. This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women, is: “What is your idea of perfect happiness?”

We would love to hear from you, so make sure you leave a comment at the end of this post.

 

1. Why Men Need Women via New York Times

 

Fascinating research about the effect of female leadership on men’s generosity, innovation and knowledge-sharing.

“We recognize the direct advantages that women as leaders bring to the table, which often include diverse perspectives, collaborative styles, dedication to mentoring and keen understanding of female employees and customers. But we’ve largely overlooked the beneficial effects that women have on the men around them. Is it possible that when women join top management teams, they encourage male colleagues to treat employees more generously and to share knowledge more freely? Increases in motivation, cooperation, and innovation in companies may be fueled not only by the direct actions of female leaders, but also by their influence on male leaders.”

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2. How To Think & Act Like An Entrepreneur via thenextwomen.com
 

“To be effective innovation has to be simple, and it has to be focused. It should do only one thing,– otherwise it confuses people.” ~ Peter Drucker, The Discipline of Innovation

Many organizations these days are trying to increase innovation, encourage creativity and develop entrepreneurial leaders. In order to think and act like an entrepreneur you need to be aware 3 elements that truly capture the essence of entrepreneurship:
 

  • No. 1  Real and compelling sense of ownership of the business.
  • No. 2 Opportunity obsession and the drive to follow through.
  • No. 3 The ability to infuse your colleagues with entrepreneurial thinking and action.

 
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3. How 16 Incredible Women Define ‘Perfect Happiness’ via Huffington Post Women

This is an amazing collection from Vanity’s Fair “Proust Questionnaire – an unscientific but illuminating personality test created in the salons of nineteenth-century Paris. When asked the question “What is your idea of perfect happiness?”, 16 brilliant women give honest, funny, touching answers. Here are some of them:

  • “A canoe, mixed sun and cloud, no deadlines in sight.” ~ Margaret Atwood
  • “Loud bar, good band, cold beer, ride home.” ~ Rachel Maddow
  • “A glass of wine at sunset on Fire Island. / No homework.” ~ Tina Fey

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 4. Lindy Boggs, Longtime Representative And Champion of Women, Is Dead at 97 via New York Times

Lindy Boggs was the first woman elected to Congress from Louisiana. Three years later,  in 1976, Mrs. Boggs became the first woman to preside over a Democratic National Convention. In her 1994 memoir, “Washington Through a Purple Veil: Memoirs of a Southern Woman,” written with Katherine Hatch, Mrs. Boggs wrote that she had learned an important lesson as a political wife and as a politician herself: “You played the Washington game with confidence and authority and graciousness.”

Mrs. Boggs fought for women’s equal pay for government jobs and equal access to government business contracts, and took a firm stand against sexual discrimination. She also, championed racial justice at a time when doing so invited the resentment if not hostility of most Southern whites. She saw the growing civil rights movement as necessary to the political reform movement of the 1940s and ’50s.

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5. Karen Finerman: How Women Can Best Navigate The Workplace via Forbes

Karen Finerman, who is an investment manager, CNBC Fast Money panelist, philanthropist and author of Finerman’s Rules: Secrets I’d Only Tell My Daughters About Business and Life, talks about how to manage work relationships, set business boundaries, why you need a financial plan and her best career advice.

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“I’ve seen women afraid to stretch for things. They avoid opportunities they don’t feel qualified for yet. Instead, they should grab risky opportunities that will force them to grow on the job and learn to do it.” ~ Karen Finerman

This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:
 

“What is your idea of perfect happiness?”

 
Let’s start a conversation. We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below.

Power Party at HUB-Boulder, March 20th, 2013

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Emerging Women Power Party
Wed, March 20, 2013
6:00-8:30pm
The HUB-Boulder, Boulder, CO
Cost: $25

Brilliant Women Igniting Change in the World

~Food, Drinks, Music, Networking, Speakers – and probably some dancing!~

Are you on fire with desire to create a life of alignment, authenticity and powerful self-expression through the work that you do? If so, join us as we celebrate the rise of women leaders and entrepreneurs, and the movement towards a more integrated approach to success.

Continue reading “Power Party at HUB-Boulder, March 20th, 2013”