Juicy Bites: Women Entrepreneurs Reshaping The World

This week we find out:

  • Why women should support, mentor and guide other women
  • How women entrepreneurship is changing the world
  • Powerful wisdom from women in history
  • Why women’s voice in politics matter
  • The inspiring legacy of Judith Daniels, a trailblazer for women in the publishing world

At the end of this post, we encourage you to join us for a conversation. This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women, is:

Cheryl Giovannoni, chief executive of advertising, Ogilvy & Mather. Photograph: Guardian

1. Take advice from the knowledgeable women around you via The Guardian

Cheryl Giovannoni, chief executive of advertising at Ogilvy & Mather shares with us a few valuable pieces of advice. She explains how important is for women to support each other and to offer mentorship.

“Women being there for each other, providing moral support, mentoring and guiding, and giving valuable time, is something that doesn’t happen enough. Helping the next generation of women to make choices that are confident and embraced is something that we all have a responsibility to do, if we have been privileged enough to get to the top ourselves.”- Cheryl Giovannoni

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2. The Global Rise of Female Entrepreneurs via Harvard Business Review

Women entrepreneurship is a phenomenal force that  is truly reshaping the world. Approximately 37% of enterprises globally are women-owned. These women reinvest, create jobs, and innovate. Also, recent research showed that entrepreneurs tend to be more successful because of their trusted status in the community.

“Entrepreneurial activity creates growth and prosperity — and solutions for social problems. And today’s trends show that women will be a driving force of entrepreneurial growth in the future.”- Jackie VanderBrug

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3. Ten Influential Quotes from 10 Powerful Women of the 20th Century via Rise and Actualize

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This is our time to rise and actualize! As women lead the way through an authentic expression of who we are, by leveraging feminine virtues instead of burying them, we will create a more integrated world where the best of the masculine and the feminine work in harmony. This post celebrates some of the most brilliant, courageous, authentic women trailblazers of the 20th century. These women’s wisdom inspire and motive us to move forward and continue to challenge the conventional.

“We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face… we must do that which we think we cannot.” ― Eleanor Roosevelt

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4. Amplifying Their Voices via Huff Post Women

Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY, the nation’s largest resource for women in politics, talks about the importance of women’s voices in Washington. Women, who are are a majority of the population — 51 %, and make 85% of the consumer purchases in our country, can no longer tolerate policies that ignore or discriminate women.

“Armed with the thoughts and opinions of our nation’s most influential constituency, there is no more pressing time to amplify the voice of American women.” — Stephanie Schriock

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5.  A Magazine for the “Career Girl” via The New Yorker

Judith Daniels who was a trailblazer for women in the publishing world, dies at 74. Daniels served in senior editing positions at The Village Voice, New York magazine, Time Inc. and Conde Naste, she also founded the only magazine for “career girls” called Savvy: The Magazine for the Executive Woman.

Judith Daniels was leaning in when Sheryl Sandberg was ten years old—which only goes to show that equity in the workplace hasn’t come such a long way, after all. “When men read about successful women, they think they see the Western civilization crumbling,” Judy told a newspaper reporter in 1977, describing her vision for Savvy. “Men tend to overreact to female ambition. To them, ambition is still a dirty word.” Still, Judy emphasized that Savvy was not meant to be anti-male. Savvy would not be “a separatist magazine for militants.”

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We are excited to start a conversation and learn more from YOU, dear emerging women. Leave a comment below:

10 Influential Quotes from 10 Powerful Women of the 20th Century

This is our time to rise and actualize! As women lead the way through an authentic expression of who we are, by leveraging feminine virtues instead of burying them, we will create a more integrated world where the best of the masculine and the feminine work in harmony. At Emerging Women Live you’ll hear from some of the most fantastic women visioneers of our time. These are women who are not afraid to be themselves as they take creative risks or launch BIG ideas into the world.
This post celebrates some of the most brilliant, courageous, authentic women trailblazers of the 20th century. These women’s wisdom inspire and motive us to move forward and continue to challenge the conventional.

1. “The most courageous act is still to think for yourself. Aloud.”― Coco Chanel

Coco Chanel (1883 – 1971) was the only fashion designer to appear on Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century. She completely revolutionized the fashion industry by freeing women of corsets and introducing a more comfortable, casual chic look. Her signature scent, Chanel No. 5, has become an iconic product.

 
Image: Amelia Earhart

2. “The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure , the process is its own reward.”― Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart (1897–1937) was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. Her courage and willpower opened the skies to other women. She was also a best-selling author, and she was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. She was also a member of the National Woman’s Party, and an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment. In 1937 while attempting to become the first person to fly around the world, Earhart’s plane disappeared over the Pacific Ocean.

Photo of Ella FITZGERALD

3. “Just don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do. Where there is love and inspiration, I don’t think you can go wrong.” ― Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald (1918–1996) is considered one of the greatest jazz singers of all time. Over the course of her 59-year recording career, she sold 40 million copies of her 70-plus albums, winning countless awards and commendations, including honorary doctorates at Yale and Dartmouth, the National Medal of Arts, and 13 Grammy Awards, including one in 1967 for Lifetime Achievement. In 1979 she was given a Kennedy Center Award for her lifetime in the performing arts.

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4. “I tore myself away from the safe comfort of certainties through my love for truth – and truth rewarded me.” ― Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir (1908 – 1986) was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist, and social theorist. In 1949, Simone de Beauvoir published The Second Sex, which quickly became a feminist classic, inspiring women of the 1950s and 1960s to examine their role in culture. In the chapter “Woman: Myth and Reality” of The Second Sex, Beauvoir argued that men had made women the “Other” in society by putting a false aura of “mystery” around them. She argued that men used this as an excuse not to understand women or their problems and not to help them, and that this stereotyping was always done in societies by the group higher in the hierarchy to the group lower in the hierarchy.

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5. “Each person must live their life as a model for others.” ― Rosa Parks

 

Rosa Parks (1913 – 2005) was an African-American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement”.  On December 1, 1955, an unknown seamstress in Montgomery, Alabama refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger. This brave woman, Rosa Parks, was arrested and fined for violating a city ordinance, but  her act of defiance marked the beginning of the modern civil rights movement in the United States and ultimately lead to the end of legal segregation in America. Her courage made her an inspiration to freedom-loving people everywhere.

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6. “I feel there is something unexplored about women that only a woman can explore.” ― Georgia O’Keeffe

 

Georgia O’Keeffe (1887 –1986) was a prominent  woman painter. Georgia O’Keeffe prevailed in a what was a long time a man’s world, and became a key figure in the American Modern Art. In 1962, O’Keeffe was elected to the fifty-member American Academy of Arts and Letters. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1966. In 1970, when she was 83 years old, a retrospective exhibition of her work was held at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The New York critics and collectors recognized her as an artist ahead of her time. Her work hangs today in museums and private collections around the world.

7.  “Odd how the creative power at once brings the whole universe to order.” ―Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941) was an English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Woolf is a key figure in the modernist literary movement. She is best known for her writings between World War I and World War II including the 1929 essay, “A Room of One’s Own,” and novels Mrs. Dalloway and Orlando. In her work she examined the difficulties that female writers and intellectuals face because men hold disproportionate legal and economic power and the future of women in education and society.

8. “We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face… we must do that which we think we cannot.” ― Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962) was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, holding the post from 1933 to 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office. She was the first presidential spouse to hold press conferences, write a syndicated newspaper column, and speak at a national convention. As a champion of human rights, she strove to further women’s causes as well as the causes of black people, poor people, and the unemployed. She served as the first chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights, and oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Later she chaired the John F. Kennedy administration’s Presidential Commission on the Status of Women.

9. “True happiness… is not attained through self-gratification, but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.”  ― Helen Keller

 

Helen Keller (1880–1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. A childhood disease left Helen deaf, mute, and blind. Her story became popular through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Keller campaigned for women’s suffrage and labor rights. She was inducted into the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame in 1971. Keller wrote a total of 12 published books and several articles.

10.  “Woman must not accept; she must challenge. She must not be awed by that which has been built up around her; she must reverence that woman in her which struggles for expression.” ― Margaret Sanger

 

Margaret Sanger (1879–1966) was an American birth control activist, sex educator, and nurse. Sanger popularized the term birth control, opened the first birth control clinic in the United States, and established organizations that evolved into the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Sanger’s efforts contributed to several judicial cases that helped legalize contraception in the United States. Sanger is regarded as a leading figure in the battle for American women’s rights.

Want more? Check out these 10 Badass Quotes from 10 Badass Women:

 

And then join ALL the badasses at our annual Emerging Women Live! Registration is now open HERE.

Words of Wisdom from our Speakers at Power Party New York, September 10th, 2013

Four fantastic women are ready to share their wisdom with you, on September 10th in NYC at Power Party New York. I hope you can join us and experience the energy and receive the amazing gifts these women have to offer.

We encourage you to step out of your comfort zone, to open up and allow yourself to be challenged, to ask yourself questions you would have never dared to ask, and to receive the answers and the guidance you need to shift your paradigm of success. Power Parties are authentic networking events like no other you’ve ever experienced. We ask real questions, and we connect because of our passions and not because of our status. We embrace vulnerability, and our feminine power. We courageously listen, learn and grow.

Power Party New York is Emerging Women’s 5th local event. Our goal is to bring together brilliant women and build a veritable tribe committed to truthful living. With your support we can generate real change that empowers women not only in our communities but around the world.

Join us and begin creating a life of alignment, authenticity and powerful self-expression!

If you can’t make it in person to Power Party New York, you can still participate via live-stream. Please RSVP on Facebook, and we will share the live-stream link closer to the date.

RSVP on Facebook HERE

Register on Eventbrite  HERE  (Early Bird Pricing Ends August 30th)

Below you’ll find a 4 quotes from our fabulous presenters at Power Party New York. Enjoy!

Speakers:

Mama Gena

Regena Thomashauer (Mama Gena) is a revolution: an icon, teacher, author, mother and one of a handful of pioneers on the planet researching the nature of pleasure and dedicating her life to the discipline of pleasure and fun.

Image by Ibai Acevedo
Image by Ibai Acevedo

Kate Northrup

Kate Northrup is a professional freedom seeker and creative entrepreneur. She created financial freedom for herself at the age of 28 through building a team of more than 1,000 wellness entrepreneurs in the network marketing industry.

Image by Ibai Acevedo
Image by Ibai Acevedo

 Robyn Hatcher

Robyn Hatcher is an author and communication skills expert and Founder of SpeakEtc., a boutique communication and presentation-skills training company. Once an extremely shy child, Robyn is now passionate about helping individuals express themselves effectively and powerfully.

Image by Brandon C. Long

Amy Ferris

Amy Ferris is an author, screenwriter, playwright, and editor. Her memoir, Marrying George Clooney, Confessions From A Midlife Crisis was produced and performed as an Off-Broadway play (CAP21 Theater Company) in 2012.

Image by Michael Vincent Manalo
Image by Michael Vincent Manalo

Register for EW Power Party New York  HERE

Power Party New York is an event in support of Emerging Women Live, October 10-13, 2013, a national event at the St. Julien Hotel which will feature the following speakers: Brené Brown, Elizabeth Gilbert, Eve Ensler, Alanis MorissetteSobonfu Somé, Ani DiFranco, Kelly McGonigal, Tara Mohr, Tami Simon, Kristin Neff, Jennifer Lee, Sera Beak and many more!

Check out the Emerging Women Power Party in action:

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Juicy Bites This Week: Overcoming our Fears

This week we learn:

  • Wisdom from pioneer science woman Maria Mitchell
  • Why it’s important to take credit for your work
  • The top 100 websites for women
  • Why startup failure is not the end of the world

At the end of this post, we encourage you to join us for a conversation. In one word (or more) tell us:

What does it take to overcome our fears?

1. Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science via Brain Pickings

Maria Mitchell was the first woman to work as a professional astronomer. She became professor of astronomy and the only woman on the faculty at Vassar College in 1865. A trailblazer woman in science, a fighter for equal pay and equality in education, she also co-founded the American Association for the Advancement of Women and became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

From Maria Mitchell: Life, Letters and Journals (public library; free download) — emerges a portrait of a fascinating, fearless woman.

Check out this diary entry from 1874:

“For women there are, undoubtedly, great difficulties in the path, but so much the more to overcome. First, no woman should say, ‘I am but a woman!’ But a woman! What more can you ask to be?

Born a woman — born with the average brain of humanity — born with more than the average heart — if you are mortal, what higher destiny could you have? No matter where you are nor what you are, you are a power — your influence is incalculable; personal influence is always underrated by the person. We are all centers of spheres — we see the portions of the sphere above us, and we see how little we affect it. We forget the part of the sphere around and before us — it extends just as far every way.”

She also encouraged the freedom of thought:

“Women, more than men, are bound by tradition and authority. What the father, the brother, the doctor, and the minister have said has been received undoubtingly. Until women throw off this reverence for authority they will not develop. When they do this, when they come to truth through their investigations, when doubt leads them to discovery, the truth which they get will be theirs, and their minds will work on and on unfettered.”

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2. What are we all so afraid of? via The Telegraph

A new blog, ifuwerentafraid.tumblr.com shows the impact fear can have on women’s lives. The blog is hosted by Lean In, the campaign run by Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook and the author of Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.

Anna Maxted, a bestselling author based in North London, England – no stranger to crippling anxiety – wonders what she’d do if she weren’t afraid.

“You gaze at this parade of women on If U Weren’t Afraid and suddenly understand that your fears are ordinary, honest. And yet, how sad to see those discarded dreams.”

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3. Why You Need To Brag More (And How To Do It) via Forbes Woman

A May 2013 study published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin found that women who work with men are far less likely to take credit for their work than those who collaborate with other women. Instead of  truly accepting their accomplishments , women give away the credit, talking about the great team they had, the collaborative efforts involved, etc. Familiar right? Instead of saying thank you, women are unnecessarily modest.

“A 2012 report from management consulting firm Accenture called “The Next Generation of Working Women” found that women are less likely to speak up than men, less likely to proactively manage their own careers, and less likely to ask for a raise. According to an NPR report that aired last year, the last fact can mean anywhere from $1 million to $1.5 million in lost earnings over a woman’s lifetime. Owning up to your accomplishments isn’t about arrogance; it’s about equality.” ~ Peggy Drexler

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4. The 100 Best Websites For Women, 2013 via Forbes Woman

The fourth annual list of FORBES 100 Best Websites for Women is a formidable resource.  We are curious which one is your favorite? Leave your suggestion in the comment box below.

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5. Why you should ignore startup failure stats via VentureBeat

Melania Brescia Photography
Melania Brescia Photography

Running a startup that eventually fails can be a valuable experience, writes Eran Laniado, managing director of BMN.

Eran explains:

“[…] not attempting to pursue one’s dream may be very frustrating. Moreover, those who never try will never fail. Those who never fail find it difficult to cope with challenging situations outside of their comfort zone when these eventually arise. A failure today may teach a person to cope more successfully with similar situations in the future.”

Continue reading…

This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:

Let’s start a conversation. We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below.

Juicy Bites This Week – Accepting The Truth of Who You Are

This week we find out:

  • Fascinating research that points out the achievements and challenges women face in the workplace
  • Alanis Morissette’s advice for women who are on the precipice of their own Emergence
  • Women’s barriers to becoming leaders, and candidates for senior positions
  • The inspiration behind Emerging Women
  • How self-compassion can help us accept the truth of who we are

At the end of this post, we encourage you to join us for a conversation. This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women, is:

What allows you to accept the truth of who you are?

1. Women in the Workplace: A Research Roundup via Harvard Business Review

This article explores recent research by business, psychology, and sociology scholars that offers a window into women’s collective experiences in the workplace, bringing light to issues such as:

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Equal Pay
  • Leadership Qualities

Continue reading…

2. Alanis Morissette – Creative Intimacy and the Merging of Yin and Yang via Grace & Fire

Emerging Women is happy to announce the launch of our podcast series: Grace & Fire.

Our first podcast features the amazing powerhouse Alanis Morissette as she talks about:

  • Vulnerability
  • Strength with Femininity and balancing the Yin/Yang or Masculine and Feminine essence
  • The effect of success on the creative process
  • How anger can actually build intimacy in relationship
  • And finally, Alanis gives her one piece of advice for women who are on the precipice of their own Emergence.

Alanis is a keynote speaker at the 2013 Emerging Women Live Conference, October 10th-13th in Boulder, CO.

Listen to the podcast HERE

3. Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers via Harvard Business Review

We are seeing more and more companies make gender diversity a priority. Despite the good intentions of their employers, women still face hurdles to becoming leaders and candidates for senior positions.

“Becoming a leader involves much more than being put in a leadership role, acquiring new skills, and adapting one’s style to the requirements of that role. It involves a fundamental identity shift. Organizations inadvertently undermine this process when they advise women to proactively seek leadership roles without also addressing policies and practices that communicate a mismatch between how women are seen and the qualities and experiences people tend to associate with leaders.”

Continue Reading…

4. LeapCast Podcast Episode #3 – Chantal Pierrat via LeapCast

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Check out this podcast series from LeapCast – a catalytic community for passion-seeking women.

Tune in to learn what inspired Chantal to start Emerging Women Live, the fears that surfaced as she was launching, and how she pushed past them.

Listen to the podcast HERE

5. Embracing Our Common Humanity With Self-Compassion via Huff Post Healthy Living

Kristin Neff talks about the importance of self-compassion and being in touch with our common humanity, and how that allows us to be more understanding and less judgmental about our inadequacies, and more aligned with the truth of who we are. Recognizing that we are not alone in our suffering, and that failure and imperfection is inevitable we are able to be acceptant of ourselves and less intimidated by our mistakes.

“One of the most important elements of self-compassion is the recognition of our shared humanity. Compassion is, by definition, relational. Compassion literally means “to suffer with,” which implies a basic mutuality in the experience of suffering. The emotion of compassion springs from the recognition that the human experience is imperfect, that we are all fallible.”

Kristin Neff is a speaker at the 2013 Emerging Women Live Conference, October 10th-13th in Boulder, CO.

This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:

What allows you to accept the truth of who you are?

Let’s start a conversation. We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below.

Juicy Bites This Week: The Road to Accepting Your Feminine Power

This week we find out:

  • Tara Sophia Mohr’s interpretation of “purpose of life”
  • What are the 4 women’s issues that haven’t changed since 1911
  • How to unlearn in order to accept your feminine power
  • Why in order to succeed women need more ambition

At the end of this post, we encourage you to join us for a conversation. This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women, is:

1. Debunking the Whole “Life Purpose” Thing via Tara Sophia Mohr Wise Living

Tara Sophia Mohr believes that the traditional “life purpose” that each of us is searching for with angst, can actually be something that we don’t even acknowledge in our lives. In this blog post Tara also offers a short practice of how you can connect with your true purpose every morning.

“Here’s the truth: Your purpose is to bring more love to this earth. It is to heal where there is brokenness. It is to bring light where there is darkness. It is to restore sanity where insanity reigns, kindness where fear has taken over.”

Continue Reading…

2. Four Women’s Issues That Haven’t Changed Since 1911 via Huff Post Women

Over 100 years ago, radical writer and activist Emma Goldman penned the essay “The Tragedy of Woman’s Emancipation.” Goldman explored issues of equal pay, the tension between family life and home life, and the obstacles that inhibit true gender equality. Many of  the issues Goldman fought for feel nearly as relevant now as they must have then. Here are 4 of them:

1. Men dominate many of the most esteemed professional fields — and get paid more for their work.

2. Work stress disproportionately impacts women.

3. The “freedom” the workplace supposedly offers women sometimes doesn’t feel so free at all.

4. Women are doubling up on work at home and outside of the home.

Continue Reading…

3. Unlearning to find your way via Role Models Wanted

I had the great pleasure to be interviewed by Jenn Aubert, an entrepreneur, acupuncturist, business mindset coach, and writer. Her mission is to help women entrepreneurs get out of their own way so that they can live big. She helps female entrepreneurs bust through limiting beliefs, fears and self-doubts so that they can build and grow successful businesses.

In this interview we talk about the road to accepting your feminine power, and learning how to incorporate more feminine leadership qualities into your professional life; how to achieve true connection, collaboration and how to allow yourself to be vulnerable.

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 4. Women Need More Than Confidence to Succeed, They Need Ambition via Huff Post Women

More than 70 percent of high school valedictorians in 2012  were women and it’s a well known fact that for decades, more female students than male students have graduated from college. Later on numbers drop dramatically for women: to 37 percent for mid-managers, and even lower, to 26 percent, for vice presidents and up. Women head slightly more than 4 percent of Fortune 500 companies. Continue Reading…

Dr. Peggy Drexler explains:

“Could bias, in fact, happen not only from the top down but also the inside out?It can. Persistent bias felt or perceived at any point in a woman’s career can erode her own ambition by causing her to feel less confident about her skills and abilities. She then strives for less. She doesn’t get the promotion or the raise not because it’s given to a man, or because she somehow doesn’t measure up, but because she’s voluntarily taken herself out of the running. It’s not confidence or ability that women are lacking, but ambition they’ve lost–or let go of–along the way.”

 

This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:

“How would describe, in one word, feminine power?”

Let’s start a conversation. We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below.

Juicy Bites This Week: Authentic Networking Makes for True Connections

This week we find out:

 

  • Arianna Huffington’s re-imagined definition of success
  • How to avoid forced networking and achieve authentic connection
  • How the success of a women, from a remote Indian village, is the foundation for many more leaders and game changers to emerge
  • Why women should not be afraid of failure
  • What are the habits of wildly successful people
  • How we adapt when it comes to learning under stress

 

At the end of this post, we encourage you to join us for a conversation. This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women, is:
 

“How would you describe, in one word, authentic networking?”

 
We would love to hear from you, so make sure you leave a comment at the end of this post.
 

1. Arianna Huffington: ‘The third revolution is to change the world that men have designed’ via The Telegraph

 

This week, Arianna Huffington was in London, leading The Huffington Post UK’s first-ever women’s conference, “The Third Metric: Redefining Success Beyond Money and Power.” The focus of the conference was to discuss a more sustainable definition of success, one that includes well-being, wisdom, and our ability to wonder and to give back.

‘It’s a model of success that’s not working for women, and it’s not working for men, either. Our workplaces are fuelled by sleep deprivation,’ says Arianna. The term ‘success’, she believes, should include the values of wellbeing, wisdom and kindness. Go-getters, she hopes, will become ‘go-givers’.

Arianna Huffington sees women leading the charge because, by coming later into the boardrooms of business, women have the clarity of vision to see them for what they are.

Continue Reading…
 

2. Permission to NOT network. (And to wear gold pants.) by Danielle Laporte

 
Danielle Laporte comes out with the truth and says: “Networking? Loathe it. And unless there’s a dance floor, I always leave the party early.” She makes the point that there are important distinction to make about networking: “ There’s fear-driven connecting, and there’s pure-enthusiasm connecting. There’s having unrealistic expectations about a connection, and there’s in-the-realm-of-possible kinds of connections.” Danielle encourages us to ease up on the forced networking and embrace true connection, and to try this:
 

“Only bust a move when you’re truly enthusiastic about doing so; when you feel you have value to offer; when you can feel a beautiful pull.”

 
Continue Reading…  
 

 3. Innovation Lessons from Shantha Ragunathan, an illiterate woman from a remote Indian village via HBR

 
Shantha Ragunathan lifted herself and her family out of poverty, bought a home and put her kids through college — all because a microfinancing scheme allowed her to buy a cow.

Shantha had strong business acumen and innate leadership qualities, even though she had no formal education. “Although she was poor in resources, she possessed the innovation mindset shared by many game changers,” write Vijay Govindarajan and Srikanth Srinivas. Continue Reading…
 

“Shantha Ragunathan is truly a game changer. Shantha’s success spread in a ripple effect from her family and her village to dozens of neighboring villages, ultimately affecting thousands of individuals. […] Even more important, by serving as a role model, she created the foundation for many more such leaders and game changers to emerge.”

 

 4. Five Reasons Why Women Fear Career Failure (And Why We Shouldn’t) via Huff Post Women

 

Women entrepreneurs deal with plenty of obstacles, but, according to a new study, the biggest challenge they face is something self-created. It’s the fear of failure which disproportionately impacts women. Julie Zeilinger identifies 5 reasons why women across career fields fear failure:
 

  1. Women’s unique history of exclusion adds pressure not to fail.
  2. Women define success differently — and thus what works for us may look like “failing.”
  3. We’re taught to view success as a linear progression — and anything that deviates from that progression as failure.
  4. We believe failure is permanent.
  5. When women do experience failure, they try to hide rather than acknowledge it. This silence creates the myth that they are the only ones who have failed.

 
Continue reading… 
 

5. Getting ahead: Habits of wildly successful people via Fast Company

 

There is no recipe for success, but, you can definitely move ahead by developing healthy habits. Here are some of the habits of highly successful and productive people:
 

  1. Get up insanely early
  2. Keep promises, no matter how small
  3. Learn how to tell stories
  4. Lead, don’t dictate
  5. Don’t be afraid–or embarrassed–of your failures
  6. Ask questions, a lot of them

 
See the entire list here
 

6. Balancing yourself: Study Shows that Brain Makes Adjustments to Learn Under Stress via Huff Post Women

 

Our brains are pretty adaptable when it comes to learning under stress. When we have to acquire new knowledge under stress, the brain generally employs unconscious rather than conscious learning processes, a Ruhr-Universität Bochum study finds.

Although it’s quite an interesting study, we know that the brain functions optimally when it’s not under stressed. Previous research has shown stress to have a significant effect on cognitive functioning including poor memory, decreased focus, and trouble learning. Continue Reading…
 

“To minimize stress and super-charge your brain power, try incorporating mindfulness into your everyday life. The practice of cultivating mindful awareness has been associated with lower stress levels.”

 

This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:

“How would you describe, in one word, authentic networking?”

Let’s start a conversation. We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below.

Juicy Bites This Week: Women Define Happiness

Juicy Bites:  small nibbles of quality content.

This week we find out:
 

  • What do women have to do with Bill Gates’s generosity?
  • How can we adopt entrepreneurial thinking?
  • What’s Tina Fey’s definition of ‘Perfect Happiness’?
  • What role did Lindy Boggs play in Women’s History?
  • What’s Karen Finerman’s career advice?

 
At the end we encourage you to join us for a conversation. This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women, is: “What is your idea of perfect happiness?”

We would love to hear from you, so make sure you leave a comment at the end of this post.

 

1. Why Men Need Women via New York Times

 

Fascinating research about the effect of female leadership on men’s generosity, innovation and knowledge-sharing.

“We recognize the direct advantages that women as leaders bring to the table, which often include diverse perspectives, collaborative styles, dedication to mentoring and keen understanding of female employees and customers. But we’ve largely overlooked the beneficial effects that women have on the men around them. Is it possible that when women join top management teams, they encourage male colleagues to treat employees more generously and to share knowledge more freely? Increases in motivation, cooperation, and innovation in companies may be fueled not only by the direct actions of female leaders, but also by their influence on male leaders.”

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2. How To Think & Act Like An Entrepreneur via thenextwomen.com
 

“To be effective innovation has to be simple, and it has to be focused. It should do only one thing,– otherwise it confuses people.” ~ Peter Drucker, The Discipline of Innovation

Many organizations these days are trying to increase innovation, encourage creativity and develop entrepreneurial leaders. In order to think and act like an entrepreneur you need to be aware 3 elements that truly capture the essence of entrepreneurship:
 

  • No. 1  Real and compelling sense of ownership of the business.
  • No. 2 Opportunity obsession and the drive to follow through.
  • No. 3 The ability to infuse your colleagues with entrepreneurial thinking and action.

 
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3. How 16 Incredible Women Define ‘Perfect Happiness’ via Huffington Post Women

This is an amazing collection from Vanity’s Fair “Proust Questionnaire – an unscientific but illuminating personality test created in the salons of nineteenth-century Paris. When asked the question “What is your idea of perfect happiness?”, 16 brilliant women give honest, funny, touching answers. Here are some of them:

  • “A canoe, mixed sun and cloud, no deadlines in sight.” ~ Margaret Atwood
  • “Loud bar, good band, cold beer, ride home.” ~ Rachel Maddow
  • “A glass of wine at sunset on Fire Island. / No homework.” ~ Tina Fey

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 4. Lindy Boggs, Longtime Representative And Champion of Women, Is Dead at 97 via New York Times

Lindy Boggs was the first woman elected to Congress from Louisiana. Three years later,  in 1976, Mrs. Boggs became the first woman to preside over a Democratic National Convention. In her 1994 memoir, “Washington Through a Purple Veil: Memoirs of a Southern Woman,” written with Katherine Hatch, Mrs. Boggs wrote that she had learned an important lesson as a political wife and as a politician herself: “You played the Washington game with confidence and authority and graciousness.”

Mrs. Boggs fought for women’s equal pay for government jobs and equal access to government business contracts, and took a firm stand against sexual discrimination. She also, championed racial justice at a time when doing so invited the resentment if not hostility of most Southern whites. She saw the growing civil rights movement as necessary to the political reform movement of the 1940s and ’50s.

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5. Karen Finerman: How Women Can Best Navigate The Workplace via Forbes

Karen Finerman, who is an investment manager, CNBC Fast Money panelist, philanthropist and author of Finerman’s Rules: Secrets I’d Only Tell My Daughters About Business and Life, talks about how to manage work relationships, set business boundaries, why you need a financial plan and her best career advice.

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“I’ve seen women afraid to stretch for things. They avoid opportunities they don’t feel qualified for yet. Instead, they should grab risky opportunities that will force them to grow on the job and learn to do it.” ~ Karen Finerman

This week’s Juicy Bites question for you, dear emerging women is:
 

“What is your idea of perfect happiness?”

 
Let’s start a conversation. We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below.

Power Party Seattle Speaker: Danielle LaPorte

Danielle LaPorte is an authentic powerhouse.

All it takes to understand and appreciate that is to simply go to her website and read a blog post, watch a video, or listen to her speak. Her unique brand of wisdom is a refreshing remedy for all the overused and outdated self-help/business/marketing practices out there. Danielle’s approach is different. It’s insightful, smart and engaging.

Danielle encourages us to make room in our lives for the truth of who we are, to embrace our neglected passions, to respect our fears, and to welcome our authentic powers. In an interview she mentioned:

“Burnout is not a badge of honor. When things are easy for you, when you’re living and working from that place of your true strength  and natural talent, you’re happier. It’s super basic. You’re in a better mood. When you’re in that place, you’re more energized. You get to be of more service to other people.”

“Creating life on your own terms,” the credo of her book, The Fire Starter Sessions (Random House/Crown) is essential for shifting our paradigm of success. Cultivating and expressing, instead of suppressing our unique self, is what gives us our competitive edge. Danielle believes that: “You will always be too much of something for someone: too big, too loud, too soft, too edgy. If you round out your edges, you lose your edge.”

Danielle is our keynote speaker at Emerging Women Power Party in Seattle, August 14th, 2013. You can reserve your spot here: http://powerpartyseattle.eventbrite.com/

The event will also be live streamed. Save the date HERE

Enjoy this inspirational video “A Credo for Making it Happen” by Danielle LaPorte:

10 Badass Quotes from 10 Badass Women

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What makes our Emerging Women Live speakers so unique?  Their authenticity, vulnerability, and courage. These are women who are not afraid to be themselves as they take creative risks or launch BIG ideas into the world. These are women who believe in the whole story, not just the pretty faces and the happy endings. These women represent an excellent blend of grace and grit – a formula that seems to be emerging in women leaders in all areas of our society. We hope you enjoy this list of Badass Quotes. Just click on a name to hear more from each woman – and join us for the live event to experience the full breadth of what these luminaries have to offer!

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